Power To The People

This one’s a bit pointless, even by my standards. Sorry. Let’s start with a re-watching of the opening titles for Citizen Smith.

Power To The People

First off, it always amazes me that The Red Flag is set to the tune of O, Tannenbaum, a song about a Christmas tree. But that’s not what I bought you here to talk about today.

As Wolfie emerges from the station and crosses the road, my eye is always drawn to the men on the traffic island, doing some building work. I started to wonder what it is they’re doing. It looks like they’re building something, but the truth is, they’re doing the opposite.

They’re actually starting to dismantle that traffic island.

Have a look at the junction now.

Click to embiggen …

As you can see, they’ve widened the road, and as a result they’ve had to move the statue across the way outside of the station itself.

If we swing Google around, we might also get an idea of where the camera was set up to get that opening shot. My money is on top of the Money Shop.

The Daniels Boyle

This is going to get a bit convoluted, so bear with me.

Last night, I was watching Keeping Up Appearances, the Patricia Routledge sitcom from the 90s. As is my wont, I sometimes look at Wikipedia whilst watching 90s sitcoms (I mean, it’s a 90s sitcom but it has a whole episode about a vicar coming to tea, which never even happened in the 70s).

Whatever, Wikipedia reminded me of Hetty Wainthropp Investigates, the cosy crime drama Routledge wanted to focus on instead of more buckets of Hyacinth.

Listen to how he tries to pronounce the title at the end …

Now, for some reason, this put me in mind of Hamish Macbeth. I have no idea why … maybe because it was on around the same time, or because Hamish Macbeth felt like a cosy police drama, I just don’t know. So I wandered on over to the page about that.

And saw that it was written by Danny Boyle.

What?

Danny Boyle?

I don’t remember any scenes of Hamish lobbing a pint over his shoulder, or an expletive laden speech about bringing cards on a coach journey.

My brain was playing tricks on me. It had seen Robert Carlyle, and immediately linked him indelibly to Danny Boyle.

Because Hamish Macbeth was actually written by Daniel Boyle.

I don’t feel too bad, because even IMDB gets confused, and lists Daniel Boyle as the director of the 2012 Olympic opening ceremony.

But the confusion is ripe.

I remembered then that I was once watching Inspector Morse, and saw that it had been written by Daniel Boyle, and had to look it up, wondering if Daniel was Danny using a more formal moniker in his earlier days.

It doesn’t help that Danny Boyle actually directed two episodes of Inspector Morse, though not two that Danny wrote.

So, one of the Daniels Boyle writes but doesn’t direct, and one of the Daniels Boyle directs but doesn’t write, though Danny Boyle did direct the show that Daniel Boyle wrote, even though Danny Boyle didn’t direct the particular shows that Daniel Boyle wrote.

Clear?

Good.

Argh, I’ve just realised Shirley Henderson was in Trainspotting too.

My brain hurts.

Boy Wonders Or Boys Wonder?

I can’t even remember what it was that triggered my thought, but I was reading something or other yesterday which made me ponder …

Is the plural of Boy Wonder:

  • Boy Wonders
  • Boys Wonder

So I put a poll up on Twitter, and as of now, the split is exactly 50/50.

I think it’s like Attorneys General, because otherwise it’s it’s just a boy with many wonders.

So I asked Facebook, and they were much more decisive over there.

Boy Wonders got 17% and Boys Wonder got 83%.

Facebook is right. For once.

Did Tracey Ullman Date Vyvyan Basterd?

Although I don’t like these shared universe theories, I do keep stumbling across them. A tweet on that there Twitter made me seek out the Tracey Ullman cover of the Madness song, My Girl┬ácalled My Guy.

First of all, I don’t really understand why Neil Kinnock is in this video, nor why he seems to be trying to get off with Tracey Ullman’s mum.

Anyway, what caught my attention (other than this being a really good cover version), is that yellow Ford Anglia with red flame decals at the start. It doesn’t just bear a striking resemblance to Vyvyan’s car from The Young Ones

… is IS Vyvyan’s car from The Young Ones.

Check out the number plate.

Assuming the release date of the single is around the time Tracey was dropped at the bus stop, it’s March 1984. Vyvyan still owns that car until his death on June 19th 1984.

But that’s clearly not Vyvyan driving it.

It could be Mike I suppose, at a push.

So, has Vyv loaned his car to a friend (unlikely)? …

… though he does like Mike more than Neil.

I’ll tell you who it most looks like.

This guy. From their party. Sat on the arm of the sofa.

But that’s Rik’s ‘friend’, and Vyv is even less likely to loan his car to someone Rik knows than he is to Neil.

It’s a mystery.

 

A Moment In The Young Ones You’ve Never Seen Before

I was moving frame by frame through the opening sequence of Boring, from the first series of The Young Ones, and I found this flash frame at 1m25s2f.

It pops up just after the skating vegetables, and just before we cut to Neil sitting in his window, looking out at the dawn.

In the second series of the show, these flash frames were deliberate things, as we explored here, but they weren’t utilised in the first series. So this is a genuine rogue frame, left over from an earlier edit, and overlooked by accident.

It’s obviously part of the opening sequence, where the house is full of wondrous things before the cock crows, including those skating love vegetables, and Lord Kitchener at the kitchen table. Maybe it was a special effect that didn’t quite work. Maybe the rug was floating around the house, having a wander, before rushing back to the doorway.

Anyone know any more about this?